Do Not Sell My Personal Information Jump to content

Help Check Guide Buying 1st Subaru


Recommended Posts

To visually check a shock you're looking for an oily stain down the casing. It'll look wet or like it's had WD40 on it. You can feel it too if you can get your hands in. Could also bounce each corner although it's a bit of a primitive technique. If you test drive the car and it has failed you may notice that shock feels boaty and not as solid as the others. Excessive bouncing will also show a problem.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 50
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Engine Although STis have uprated engine internals they still need to be cared after in the same manner as the WRX motors. Oil changes should be carried out every 5,000 miles for Classics or 7,000 mi

Great post.    I'm sure I saw you wrote some buying advice for another guy in here but just can't find it now. I've written what I can remember and added a few more suggestions  :)   Check the oi

Another thing to look out for is wear in the front CV joints. Easy way to tell is to open the windows and pull away from stationary on full lock with a bit of welly. Do this in both directions a few

Mine slaps from cold all the time until the oil is up to full operating temprature, it's a bad piston skirt design that's to blame (was rectified on other years) but due to the lay out of the engine most of us suffer a little slap when it gets colder out,

It sounds like a high pitched metallic clapping, if it's a dull thud or an irregular nose then it's probably knocking as opposed to slap,

A good map won't cure it, as it's only when the pistons have contracted slightly and don't 'fill' the bores like they do when warm.

As for the shock are you still looking at the forester ? Or am I confused?

90%of foz's have sls suspension which dies and leaves you with saggy !Removed! syndrome, looks a bit like a dog sitting on its rear when the car is stationary,

You can grab the rear arch and lift up, assuming it's not full of rust, to unload the suspension, if it drops loads when you let go the shock is dead,

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...
  • 1 month later...
  • 5 months later...

They are only un reliable if you rag them from cold, don't look after them neglect regular quality oil changes etc

Plenty of us are over 100k mileage wise.

The 2.5 engines have a bit of a reputation for head gasket and Ringland problems, but there are plenty that haven't gone pop too

Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
On 19/07/2013 at 3:52 PM, Gambit said:

Engine

Although STis have uprated engine internals they still need to be cared after in the same manner as the WRX motors. Oil changes should be carried out every 5,000 miles for Classics or 7,000 miles for newage, although more regular changes are not a bad thing, new spark plugs, brake fluid, transmission and diff oil should be changed every couple of years or 24,000 miles and the cambelt should be changed every 45,000 miles.

Listen for knocking coming from the engine as this could indicate piston slap or bottom end damage and the turbo should run quite quietly if the cat is still in place. And last but not least, smoke free. Turbos must also be allowed to cool down after hard driving - ask the seller what he does for the shutdown procedure. Watch for a fluctuating idle which could be a symptom of a blown mass air flow sensor or sticking wastegate solenoids. If a boost gauge has been fitted, check that the boost pressure is not exceeding 17–18psi.

 
Exhaust

The standard exhausts are fairly long lasting but most owners will have probably have replaced the original exhaust with a stainless steel aftermarket performance exhaust system, due to their performance and their very reasonable prices. Hayward and Scott to name just one. If the cat is removed on the Impreza you are looking at buying make sure to get the old cat from the seller, if it’s not available budget this into the price, as you will need one come MOT time.

 
Transmission

A powerful car with 4wd is always going to punish the gearbox especially so if it has been modified. It’s not uncommon for a clutch to last as little as 40,000 miles. Clutch judder is common on Classic’s when the car is cold. The Subaru gearbox is extremely tough but when the gearbox is warm do the usual checks to ensure that all gears engage easily with no crunching, listen out for any whining at all whether it be from the gearbox itself or from the diffs. Popping out of gear is almost unheard of, but accelerate hard from low revs in each of the gears to make absolutely sure.

 
Brakes

The OE brakes and pads are not amazing and most owners uprate the pads, discs, lines and fluid to uprated items. DOT 5.1 fluid is common, especially if your going to take the car on track. As with any car brake hard from speed to ensure the car pulls up straight and smooth with no judder. Rear brakes can seize if a car is left standing.

 
Bodywork

Accident damage is a real possibility on these cars, vulnerable areas include the front end, front and rear wings. Check the underbody thoroughly for rust as a lot of car will not have been under sealed. The bonnet is also vulnerable to stone chips, budget the repair of this into the purchase price.

 
Interior

The electrics are general sound although the cheap interior plastics can look tatty over time. The newage cars have better interiors however the seats become less ‘buckety’.

 
Suspension

Worn anti roll bar bushes can be diagnosed by knocking coming front the front suspension. It has been said that the best suspension available for the STi is it the original STi set up. So replacing does necessarily mean having to go down the performance suspension route although this may work out to be the cheapest option. If buying the older Classic shapes check the rear strut's more so if it's a UK car as they seem to rot/rust at the top around the bolts.

 

Feel free to add anything that might have been missed I will updated the post :)

Thanks for advice bought a sti forester litchfield this week and checked all areas to make sure it was a minter.

The only thing wrong is it does have tiny knock on the nearside back door where someone opened there car door on it in a teso carpark apprently :( might look at getting it out if anyone knows a good panel beater near Manchester let me know. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 months later...

Hi all. not long bought a 2006 Impreza WRX STI UK type (unconfirmed prodrive) with the bigger Brembo brakes all round. The front discs do need changing as there's about 5 minutes of lip on them both. Rear discs are fine and pads all round are about half worn.

 

Want to know people opinions/recommendations about whether it's worth sticking to blank faced discs or getting vented. Not too keen on drilled or vented and dimpled/drilled as don't see much point if I'm not tracking it, just fast road use.

I don't want to go cheap but equally dont need to go over the top. I've seen some ok priced mintex sets on eBay but just want to know what people's experiences are etc. Also what size to look for front and rear if people know please. Seen a lot of 326mm size for Brembo sets of my model type floating around.

 

Any advice much appreciated, thanks

 

Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Tapatalk

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 months later...
  • 7 months later...
13 hours ago, Gambit said:

Hope the search goes well. emoji4.png any questions feel frer to ask emoji4.png
 

Thanks Gambit. Challenge one is telling the better half. I’ve half slipped it into a WhatsApp conversations buried in amongst a shower of compliments :biggrin:, I think she’ll notice....but in previous purchases of big lumps of metal, I’ve found its generally easier to ask for forgiveness rather than permission.  :tongue:

Seen a couple of good ones, looking mainly at finding something with half decent bodywork. Perhaps I’ve missed it on here...but how does the underneath of these cars stand up to UK roads/salt...i read somewhere of subframes being shot (even though body was looking good)...Is this is the front subframe I’ve heard about, anything else underneath that I need to check out?

Ultimately I am not in the market for a A1 car (don’t have the budget), but something that I can drive out and use as my Welsh B Road machine for a couple of years at least...occasional nursery/school car too maybe :)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Haha like it. I'm lucky my nissus likes cars and the events so convincing her is never a problem. Well not until i want new parts [emoji23]

And rear archers are always a problem to look for. I used to clean mine a lot through winter as theres a lip that just right for all the nasties to sit in. Ive only see one subframe on here that failed an MOT. But worth checking under the car for sure. I have seen pictures of mint looking cars and rot under them. [emoji17]

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 8 months later...

Hi. I'm new to this club. Was looking to buy a 2003 wrx sti off a friend's son. Beautiful car but he drove it home from work one night. Parked it in the drive. Got in to go to work the next day and all four wheels had locked up. Anyone any ideas as to what it could be. Didn't wanna buy the car if it was gonna be a mega expensive fix

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 11 months later...

Hi I’ve just bought my first Subaru, an Impreza we’d with a sti upgrade. New to it all but fulfilled a dream in getting one. Used to be into the car scene in my younger years. Anyway I’m interested in going to shows, days out etc

Hope to hear from some of you soon.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...

First Diesel Subaru

Hi All,

Have been doing some research for quite a while now into getting a diesel Subaru, either Outback or Forester. I've owned two foresters in my time, both 3rd gen, both 2,5 petrols, both manuals, and have nothing but good to say about both of them, save for the fuel cost. I work in the film industry down here in Cape Town, and often fill the car up with film gear, occasionally even towing with the second one. I'll regularly drive hundreds of kilometres for work, with the gear in the back, getting something like 12,5L/100km (about 22,5 MGP UK). Even though I can usually reclaim my fuel cost, it's done at a fixed rate, and I'm still loosing out. 

I've long looked at the diesel forester, even test driving a few, and wondered if that wouldn't be the perfect replacement. But I've heard some really bad stories about the diesel Forester, albeit from people who are fairly unqualified to say so, and with little first-hand experience to cite. Hearing adages like "The diesel engine in the forester is too strong for the 6 speed manual", or "Those boxer diesels have a very limited lifespan, and very costly repairs". I've done a fair bit of looking around for advice, most of which has yielded inconsistent results, although I have seen a few times the pre-2010 diesel's running rough before warming up, but this was in colder climates in the UK, so shouldn't be an issue down here in SA.

While originally I was looking at getting a 3rd gen diesel Forester 2011-2013, the only years for diesel Foresters in SA, I'm beginning to consider the 2014-2016 diesel Outback. The idea is that I don't want something that'll give trouble soon, but also let's be honest, the newer Outback's are a big step up from the 3rd gen Forester. The fifth generation Outback was only sold in SA with the dreaded CVT, which I'm not too thrilled about, but could live with. I'm wondering though, if the boxer diesel really does have too much torque for the manual, would the CVT be a safer choice? And finally, I'm wondering if by buying a newer Outback to avoid trouble from a 3rd gen Forester, am I not actually going to buy a more expensive car with a lot more to go wrong on it? 

Any advice is appreciated, 

Cheers!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Subaru has brought out a mapping change which reduces the initial engine torque but this actually makes the engine more flexible and better at in gear acceleration. The change does mean acceleration from rest is slightly slower but acceptable. More importantly keep an eye on the oil level - too low and its a new engine. Also the DPF puts diesel in the sump if you drive too many short journeys.

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 months later...

Hi everyone, I'm in need of some help buying a 2010 legacy estate 2lt diesel with hi mileage(145k miles) that had an engine rebuild? normally I would not consider this but would like to own one. so what is the life of the engine/gear boxes as never see very hi mileage car for sale. and what other part may give problems. any pointers for inspecting this car would be greatly appreciated.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 7 months later...

 

  •  

Hi, I’m Dan and I’m new here. I’m 28 and looking to get one. I mean levorg. Spoke to one Subaru garage in Oxfordshire. £16k for 2017. 49k miles on clock. White. I wish some of u maybe can give a bit advice. Cuz I read a lot of different opinions. I would like to know if is easy to get it serviced, r they reliable? Major problems? And does 1.6 engine doing well on estate car? Cuz maybe people and mechanics from my work place keeps telling me it’s not worth it and to expensive to get it fix. I live in Pembrokeshire (south Wales) many thanks for your help guys

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...




×
×
  • Create New...




Forums


News


Membership