DaveMc

Glow Plug problems on diesel engine

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Blueprint glowplug wil be ADS71802, all same from 2010 to 2012, ashuki p/n is S785-02

eBay not cheapest for these .

Some underseal and wax protection not a bad thing on these, shultz done proper in rear wheel well/turret good and a light spray of waxoil or similar on underbody every 2-3yrs can make huge difference when car aged another 10yrs+

 

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5 hours ago, Far North Scooby said:

No, I change the front pair of glow plugs annually and the rear pair bi-annually. Probably no need where you are but there is a massive amount of salt in the air here and I've had several close calls with corroded plugs.

got it , front and rear glowplugs ,ha i am still tunes to honda engines no back and front 

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2 hours ago, Mr B said:

Blueprint glowplug wil be ADS71802, all same from 2010 to 2012, ashuki p/n is S785-02

eBay not cheapest for these .

Some underseal and wax protection not a bad thing on these, shultz done proper in rear wheel well/turret good and a light spray of waxoil or similar on underbody every 2-3yrs can make huge difference when car aged another 10yrs+

 

yeah thats 1s i will look around some of local motor factors and Arnold clark seems to have opened car parts for trade/public to capture some of spare parts business

thanks again for feedback

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4 minutes ago, Mr B said:

That is a good price .

got no where trying to find ashukis most of car factors never heard of them or didn't stock them was about to order blueprint plugs from ebay came across them on amazon . worked out in end will change plugs soon as find subru independet or 4x4 mechanic locally

thanks for pointers Mr B

n

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I’m new to the forum and have been reading this thread because we have what we now know is a glowplug problem on our 61 Outback. Our local garage has had the car three weeks and finally quoted £1500 for the repair. Does this seem reasonable? They’ve also taken the engine out of the car to do the repair - is this usual and will this have to happen every time there’s a similar problem? We’ve had Subarus for 30 yrs but this is the first time we’ve come across a fault like this.

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Not usual but possible in worse case scenario.

I would assume your garage got little experience or kit for removing broken heater plug thus made bigger job of it.
Are the stripping engine further or planning drill/pull it out .

ceramic antiseize paste and lower end of torque can help for future but best bet is make it a service item - removal and refit every 2yrs and replace after 4 or 6yrs .

 

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I've been told that there is now a tool to remove snapped plugs without removing the engine but even if that's true I suppose it depends on what exactly is left behind. You'd need to check that with a qualified mechanic. I change the front two plugs annually before they have chance to corrode and the rear two get taken out and checked and are replaced bi-annually. I just get my local garage to do this as the Subaru dealer is five hours and two islands away. I'm sure that there is no need for you in Nottinghamshire to replace plugs like this as you don't have the huge amount of salt corrosion we have here in Shetland but it might be an idea to get them checked at a major service. Of course there is a risk of snapping a working plug when you take it out but the risk of a plug seizing and then snapping can only increase the longer you leave it. My local garage took 3 days to tease out a seriously corroded plug once and that is why I now get them replaced or checked annually.

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Is a lot of kits remove broken plugs but don't always work well unless plug cooperates in way broken or during removal work steps  .

Best way is taking lot of time to not break them and using low power impact as vibrations can help loosen stuck plug without twisting head off .

I would go down and get full details from garage and ask what kit they got for broken removal and what technique used remove them (ie: did they try engine hot/cold. did they try light impact tool, did they soak with release agent overnight ect) .

Is lot of labour time when goes bad unfortunately but if this a learning experience for your garage you don't want be paying the full 1500 .

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Thank you for the advice. I suspect it is a learning experience for the garage, and doubt if they had the specialist removal tool. I don’t think they’ll reduce the price because of this though. I’m now thinking of going to Scoobyclinic in future.

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hi , 4 months on been to 3 independent Subaru dealers all have talked me out of changing plugs now left with 4 brand new blue print plugs ,  ill look into it again in spring providing they dont fail 

 

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Hi all,
I found this post and joined the forum while researching the P037E error code I am getting on my 2014 Outback diesel. The check engine light and the yellow light for the parking brake are on as well. From all I have read here my guess would be the glow plugs. I just passed 160.000km and the car is used regularly for hunting trips so it sees its fair share of heavy loads and mud.

Thank you chaps so much for compiling all this info on the glow plugs and what to watch out for. I will make sure to hand this over to my local independent garage as my guess is that they might not have Subaru specific experience.

Just one quick question: assuming the problem is indeed the glow plugs, is that an issue I could drive another 500km with or should the vehicle be moved as little as possible until it can be serviced. My local garage is swamped right now because everybody and their dog is having their tyres changed for the winter.

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Not Subaru but without realizing I drove my Merc vito with two defective glow plugs - performance was rubbish as was mpg but it still went with no damage

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Not Subaru but without realizing I drove my Merc vito with two defective glow plugs - performance was rubbish as was mpg but it still went with no damage


Cheers for the quick response, mate.

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So I finally managed to take off the air cleaner case and the ECU as well as move cables out of the way sufficiently to take off the manifold covers and take a look at the glow plugs. The good ones look like this (please excuse that pine needle there):

1882007290_19-11-1009-54-210252.thumb.jpg.90fa76478d23f38a38e98a42a18ba813.jpg

But the bad one looks like this:

582262118_19-11-1009-52-270250.thumb.jpg.2faf1662366d258901f75e539c776e0c.jpg

To me this looks like electric erosion from an arc, but I might be wrong.

Is this something that the vaunted special tool the Subaru dealerships have can deal with ? To my unscientific mind, this looks like a sure case of needs-to-be-drilled.

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